Eric Okamoto

Welcome to Lessons.com's Best of 2018 program

Dear Eric,

I'm excited to announce that you've been named Best of Lessons.com in 2018. Congratulations!

We looked at dozens of other pros in your area, scored you on more than 10 variables, and hand picked you to be part of the program.

This is no small feat. In fact, the Best of Lessons.com pros make up less than four percent of all Lessons.com professionals.

Hard work deserves recognition, so we're proud to offer you our Best ofLessons.com perks. We're placing a ribbon on your profile and quotes so customers will recognize your acheivement.

 

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citizen782

Member since 3-23-03

83 posts 11-13-03, 12:12 PM (EST)

 

"For that matter...who are..."

 

The top ten drummers in the Triangle? Why limit it to Raleigh? A lot of great drummers I know of are not strickly dedicated to a local band. They play for the love....

 

citizen782

Member since 3-23-03

83 posts 12-04-03, 10:09 PM (EST)

 

13. "RE: For that matter...who are..."

In response to message #12

 

Here's one few know but should probably be on the list...

From the Nov. 2003 issue of Modern Drummer:

Eric Okamoto from Clayton, NC claimed the title of worlds fastest hands at the 2003 summer NAMM following two days of preliminary heats when he played 1,018 single strokes in 60 seconds.

I'm impressed.

 

ZoLo

Member since 8-5-03

21 posts 12-04-03, 10:39 PM (EST)

 

14. "RE: For that matter...who are..."

In response to message #13

 

>Here's one few know but should probably be on the list...

>

>From the Nov. 2003 issue of Modern Drummer:

>

>Eric Okamoto from Clayton, NC claimed the title of worlds

>fastest hands at the 2003 summer NAMM following two days of

>preliminary heats when he played 1,018 single strokes in 60

>seconds.

>

>I'm impressed.

But can he play? I don't know the guy and I'm not trying to discount his ability, but there's so much more to being a good drummer than how many single strokes he can do in a minute. Have you heard him play?

ZoLo

 

citizen782

Member since 3-23-03

83 posts 12-05-03, 11:06 AM (EST)

 

15. "RE: For that matter...who are..."

In response to message #14

 

Ya, I have. He is good. This article could help explain why...

Ever since the first World's Fastest Drummer contest was held, drummers have been for and against it. The drummers who are against the Drumometer and the WFD contests cite that drumming is not a sport and chops are not as important as musicality. They're also

upset because they feel that practicing long hours to build chops is a waste of time that could be better spent on learning to play musically. I personally disagree. Drumming is a very physical activity that could qualify as a sport and the WFD contests simply provide a place for drummers to get together and test themselves against each other in friendly competition and in a fun environment. Because of the information that is circulated during these contests, many of the contestants find that they learn a lot more about the proper practice of drum technique. Things they can take home with them that will help them for the rest of their drumming lives. I see this as a very positive thing for the education of our future up-and-coming drummers as well as seasoned players who may never have really spent much time developing their chops properly.

As far as chops vs. musicality, playing musically is very important. Let's face it, what good is learning to play the drums at all if you're not going to be a musical drummer? However, learning to play musically is not a part of the WFD contests and shouldn't be. This is something that drummers must learn on their own. The WFD is concerned with just one aspect of drumming and that is building chops, and chops are a critically important addition to any drummer's bag of tricks as they play a key role in creativity. What good is inventing some really cool groove or fill during a performance if you don't have the chops to execute it cleanly and accurately?

gretschdrmr

Member since 4-1-03

18 posts 12-05-03, 02:13 PM (EST)

 

16. "RE: For that matter...who are..."

In response to message #15

 

>Ya, I have. He is good. This article could help explain why...

Ever since the first World's Fastest Drummer contest was held, drummers have been for and against it. The drummers who are against the Drumometer and the WFD contests cite that drumming is not a sport and chops are not as important as musicality. They're also upset because they feel that practicing long hours to build chops is a waste of time that could be better spent on learning to play musically. I personally disagree. Drumming is a very physical activity that could qualify as a sport and the WFD contests simply provide a place for drummers to get together and test themselves against each other in friendly competition and in a fun environment. Because of the information that is circulated during these contests, many of the contestants find that they learn a lot more about the proper practice of drum technique. Things they can take home with them that will help them for the rest of their drumming lives. I see this as a very positive thing for the education of our future up-and-coming drummers as well as seasoned players who may never have really spent much time developing their chops properly.

As far as chops vs. musicality, playing musically is very important. Let's face it, what good is learning to play the drums at all if you're not going to be a musical drummer? However, learning to play musically is not a part of the WFD contests and shouldn't be. This is something that drummers must learn on their own. The WFD is concerned with just one aspect of drumming and that is building chops, and chops are a critically important addition to any drummer's bag of tricks as they play a key role in creativity. What good is inventing some really cool groove or fill during a performance if you don't have the chops to execute it cleanly and accurately?

Well said. I think both are important. Drummers must have both. I know I have found myself many a night near the end of a three hour gig wishing I had more chops.

Results! Why, man, I have gotten a lot of results. I know several thousand things that won't work.

-Thomas A. Edison

ZoLo

Member since 8-5-03

21 posts 12-05-03, 07:50 PM (EST)

 

17. "RE: For that matter...who are..."

In response to message #16

 

>Well said. I think both are important. Drummers must have

>both. I know I have found myself many a night near the end

>of a three hour gig wishing I had more chops.

True, the article makes good points. I just wondered if he was being voted one of the best in the area because he could wail on a practice pad. What band does the guy play with?

ZoLo